dhyan chand face

A SALUTE TO MAJOR DHYAN CHAND

AN ILLUSTRIOUS NEIGHBOR

After the Independence (which we called ‘partition’, those days) the first peace posting of our father, the late Major Balwant Singh ji was to Meerut Cantt, where we were from late 1947 to mid-1949. The house allotted to us was a hutment on the Grass Farm Road. A few buildings away from us was the house of the legendary hockey wizard, Dhyan Chand (29 Aug 1905- 03 Dec 1979). His achievements are so well known, that I need not recount them here. What I must mention is that within our colony, he lived like any other officer; with no pretence or snobbishness. He had travelled to all corners of the world before the Second World War. During that period, it took forty days to sail from Bombay to the USA and about two weeks to get to Europe. To this one must add the several days of train journey to Bombay, and then the wait for the ship.

He carried his three Olympic Gold Medals with utter humility; and extended gracious courtesy to all his neighbours. We were told that Major Dhyan Chand was serving in the Punjab Regimental Centre. The picture which I have in my mind is one of a person of medium height and build. He was not very impressive to look at. But on the field, he exhibited infinite energy stored in that average sized frame. Here is how he looked in the evenings, whenever we saw him.

 dhyan wirh stick ed

Major Dhyan Chand (1905-1979) Notice the Punjab Regiment emblem on the pocket.

During that period, I was a seven or eight year old kid, and knew nothing about what it meant to win an Olympic Gold medal. But when our father got posted back to Meerut in 1955, I was fully aware of his fabulous achievements. During the second tenure in 1955-57, our father was in the Services Selection Board, and I had already set my heart on joining the National Defence Academy. I was in the High School, and attended the Cantonment Anglo-Bengali (CAB) school which was administered by the Meerut Sub Area. One day, Major Dhyan Chand was invited to visit our school to pep up our sportsmen. He was literally mobbed, when he arrived. Every one was keen to see him, and so a make shift dais was hastily created for him to speak to us.

Dhyan Chand was no great orator, and he had already retired from competitive hockey. Some of us had seen him play, and even though he was more than fifty years old, his dexterity with the stick was there for every one to see. To that gathering, he said some things, which did not seem to make much sense at that time. But upon return home, when I jotted down some portions of his ‘guru mantra’ I saw a great deal of depth in those profound pearls of wisdom. The next day, I showed what I had written to my teacher, and with his help, I cobbled up a small article in Hindi, which was published in the School Magazine. It was written in point form. Many years later, I translated it into English and sent it to some news papers, and it was well received. I am tempted to share it with you, on the eve of his 110th birthday, tomorrow. His ‘mantra’ was for Hockey players, but I think it can be extended to many other fields of human activity.

*

THE ‘GURU MANTRA’ FROM THE HOCKEY WIZARD

The player must NOT question the rules of the game. As far as he is concerned, they were made personally by the Almighty God : and they are good. However, if you play the game very well, or find a place of honour in the Hockey Federation, you might be allowed to comment on them and even make changes, so that the game becomes more challenging to play and exciting to watch.

It is also not for the player  to question the position allotted to him in the team. He should be grateful that he has found a place in the team. The position is of no consequence. ‘Forwards’ are only as important as the ‘full backs’ and there are matches in which the goal keeper steals the show!

It does not matter who actually scores the goal. Because, when the goal is netted, the whole team gains. Therefore, do your best to help every player to perform well.

If an opponent is playing well, do not hate or despise him for his skill. You might learn a thing or two from him. And remember, victory tastes sweet only when it is achieved against tough and determined rivals!

Enter the field with courage and humility. Play to win. But if the game goes against your side, remember that it is just a game. Accept the result with grace and dignity. Please note, that you have lost only one match. ‘Insha Allah’ there will be many more occasions to make amends!

Now here are some vital rules, which you must follow when the ball is in play:

  • Stay within the zone allotted to you. If you are the ‘right out’ do not stretch far outside the right strip.

  • If the ball is with one of your team mates, position yourself in such a manner that the player who has the ball is tempted to pass it to you. And if the ball is with the opponents, and is in the zone allotted to you, do your best to tackle him, without infringing any rule.

  • If the ball is passed to you, or you are able to secure it from the opponents, move towards the goal as swiftly as you can. Run for all you are worth, but as soon as you find that one of your team-mates is in a better position to score the goal, pass it on to him. Do not dribble merely to impress the spectators or the selectors.

  • Having passed the ball, do not get annoyed or angry with your colleagues if the goal is not scored. Your job ends when you pass the ball.

  • Do not waste your breath by shouting words of advice to your team-mates. Also, do not run about aimlessly. Conserve your energy for the moment when the ball is passed to you.

  • When the match ends, go over the events to learn from the mistakes you made. However, do not run after the press or the selectors. Recognition and fame eludes the players who try to chase it!

Many years later, when I was going through this piece, it occurred to me that life in the Army or even in the Corporate world is similar to playing hockey. Organized activity is more of a ‘team game’ like hockey or football. It is not an individual sport like tennis or athletics. Many of the above dictums are just as applicable in professional life as they are, on the sports field. We waste too much time quarrelling over the ‘rules of the game’ and instead of concentrating on the job given to us we run after the people who write reports on our performance. We also spend an undue amount of effort in organizing our postings and appointments, and since we think that we are in ‘competition’ with our colleagues and predecessors, we do all that we can to run them down. And if something is achieved, we use all means, fair and foul, to prove that no one else had any thing significant to contribute for the success of the project. We forget what the wizard said, “Having passed the ball, your job ends. It does not matter, who nets the ball. What matters is that the Goal is scored!”

The Tailpiece

Dhyan Chand lived and played during a period when there were no sponsorships and sports awards. For a living, he had to serve in the Army, and he was with his unit all through the war. Indeed, he performed his military duties to the entire satisfaction of his superiors. I can vouch for the fact that there was nothing in his house, which the others did not have, and the media did not give him any coverage after his retirement from the sport. When he left the army he was only 51 years old, and to support a family of seven children he had to take up a job of a coach. He started his life as a Sepoy, and ended up as a Major, with nothing of any monetary value to show for his stupendous achievements.

If the Bharat Ratna is awarded to him at this stage, it will not add even one millimetre to his stature. On the other hand, the prestige of the award will go up enormously! Permit me to recount a proverb,

“Honours and awards distinguish the mediocre. While the superior are embarrassed by them, the decoration itself gets devalued when awarded for lesser deeds”

I wish to end this piece with two pictures which I have picked up from the Internet.

dhyan n hitler ed

 During the Berlin Olympics in 1936, Hitler was so impressed by Dhyan Chand that he invited him to join the German Army as an officer. Dhyan Chand politely declined

dhyan statueed

 The Statue of Dhyan Chand in Delhi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

  1. Ashwani says:

    Nice One Sir

    A statue of Major Dhyan Chand is also erected in Kasauli some months ago..

  2. Sarmeet Kaur says:

    Is it true that Dhyan Chand died in utter poverty? Why did the government not provide sufficient funds for his medical treatment?
    Sarmeet

    • Surjit Singh says:

      During the days of Dhyan Chand, the sportspersons were not ‘professional players’ There was no concept of ‘sponsorship’ They were not treated like ‘stars’ as they are, these days.
      Dhyan Chand was an army officer, and he received the routine treatment, like every one else. Unfortunately, he belonged to a very humble family, so his economic position was not very comfortable.
      Surjit

  3. Lt Col David Banerji says:

    Excellent article Sir. I published this in the EME Journal in 1990 when I was the Editor. However you have since added some further information. I have passed it on to colleagues in the organisation I work for inspiration.

    Regards

    David

  4. Dear Gen Surjit,
    An excellent appraisal of our HOCKEY WIZARD; as a country and even perhaps, as an Army, we have not given him due recognition; apart from the proposal for BHARAT RATNA, the following could also be instituted;
    # Giving him the Hony Rank of MAJ GEN
    # Embellish his name as an ICON of our Army
    # DHYAN CHAND MEDAL for the best Hockey player in the ARMY TEAM

  5. Maj Gen Prabal Sen says:

    My dear Sir,

    I remember you telling us about this incident in MCEME, during 1988 -89, when you were Head, Radar Department. If my memory serves me right, an article called ‘Goal’ was published in the College house magazine ‘Happenings’ or the EME Journal. Anyway, I took this from you and as a CO of an EME Battalion ( during Op Vijay) and later in various appointments – found this very useful in instilling a sense of detachment with the officers and men towards the rewards of one’s work. Also, I used during few Sainik Sammelans ( Durbar) with telling effect.

    This is in Gita also ( Karmanye Vadhikaraste, Ma phaleshou kada chana – You have the right to perform your actions,but you are not entitled to the fruits of the actions. Also – Ma Karma Phala Hetur Bhurmatey Sangostva Akarmani – Do not let the fruit be the purpose of your actions, and therefore you won’t be attached to not doing your duty – this is also from Gita I think -just downloaded these from the net), that is heavy Sanskrit – however, the wizard with the stick makes it very simple and direct.

    Thanks Sir, that indeed was a great piece.

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Hi PC,
      Yes. I remember you telling me that there is a lot in this piece which is taught to us by the Holy Gita.
      Incidentally, Rabindranath Tagore’s Gitanjali has several verses which emphasises these very dictums.
      Surjit

  6. J Thomas says:

    Hi Surjit, Your good fortune to have known such a great man.

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Thomas,
      Indeed. And as you can see, he left a profound impression on my thinking. Another sports personality, Maj (later Lt Col) Hemu Adhikari was our Company Commander in the IMA. He also exhibited the traits of a typical sportsman: focussed, and yet large hearted. He was forever compassionate and fair in his judgement.
      Surjit

  7. OM PRAKASH SAXENA says:

    Dear Sir,

    Wonderful and apt write up indeed with amazing and beautiful comments! What better tribute than this to the great legend???

    Warm regards,

    O P SAXENA

  8. Moreshwar Kelkar says:

    Hi Surjit,
    There was a xxxx xx I created… while messaging.
    “Tussi Great Ho” was Meant for you, the narrater….While
    Me, a VI Stringer ……. (2956………) etc… was to describe self!
    I sincerely apologise for xxxx xx.
    No malice, No ill will… intended or meant!
    Sorry and Thanks in anticipation for Granting Pardon.
    Regards . Moru

  9. mahavir nautiyal says:

    Great write up on Maj Dhyan Chand, Surjit ji. Profound thanks and regards.
    We elate and inspire ourselves by remembering the greats, the likes of Major Dhyan Chand. Hitler could spot and reward talent. Unfortunately we Indians don’t do or do it only when the outsiders have done it. Rabindranath Tagore was recognised only after he received Nobel prize. Hockey is gradually losing its lustre and lure in the cricket crazy India. It is the money and glamour associated with cricket. The skill and stamina required in hockey or football is much more than in cricket but we have wrong priorities.
    lastly, I admire greatly the camaraderie shown between the ex- army officers, the valiant soldiers who are the pride of India, as is evident from their comments.

  10. Vinay Kapoor says:

    Thanks, Sir.

    Nice piece.

    Regards.

    Vinay Kapoor
    9717252847

  11. Brig N K Dhand says:

    DEAR FELLOW VETERANS

    I THANK GEN SURJIT SINGH FOR SHARING WITH

    US HIS WRITE UP ON THE GREAT MAN THAT HE WAS.

    THE GREAT INDIAN WHO TURNED DOWN HITLER’S

    OFFER OF MAKING HIM A GENERAL IN THE

    GERMAN ARMY IF HE AGREES TO SWITCH OVER

    TO GERMANY,

    THE HUMBLE MAN ELECTED TO

    REMAIN AS A INDIAN FAUJI.

    WHILE I COMMANDED UNIT IN JHANSI,

    WHENEVER I CROSSED HIS STATUE THERE I

    SALUTED HIM FOR HIS NATIONAL SPIRIT. MY

    DRIVER WONDERED AS TO WHAT WAS WRONG

    WITH HIS CO SAAB.

    WHEN I PUT HIM AT EASE BY

    RELATING THE STORY OF THE HOCKEY FINALS OF

    OLYMPICS BETWEEN GERMANY AND INDIA ATTENDED BY

    ADOLF HITLER IN PERSON AND HIS OFFER TO HIM,

    THE DRIVER WOULD SLOW DOWN THE JONGA AND

    COME TO SITTING SAWDHAAN AND DAHINE DEKH

    AT THE SPOT LETTING ME PAY MY RESPECTS TO

    THE OLD SOLDIER SPORTSMAN OF CLASS.

    WE SALUTE YOU SIR- YOU HAVE BEEN A REAL JEWEL IN

    THE TRUE SENSE IN OUR EYES.

    Brigadier Narinder Dhand (Veteran)
    NOIDA -(NCR) – 201303
    Visit Veteran’s Own Web Site at
    http://signals-parivaar.blogspot.in

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Dear Brig Dhand,
      Your message was delivered to me in bold red letters. I could see how strongly you were moved by the spirit of this great man.
      In my view, he was an honest man, who had understood the true meaning of life!
      Thanks for your message
      Surjit

  12. Lalit Mohan Malhotra says:

    Sir
    Really enlightened going through it

    warm regards

    Lalit

  13. Lt Gen Harbhajan Singh says:

    Dear Surjit Ji,

    You have such a flair for writing. Very nice piece indeed.

    Best wishes and kind regards.

    Harbhajan

    • Maj Gen Surjit Singh says:

      Dear General,

      Beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder!

      Very few people say what you do…I suspect you are very kind to me!!!

      Surjit

  14. Vinod Bahl says:

    Surjit

    Thank you for sharing … what a revelation this is to me … I suspect, I am a bit jealous that you personally had seen and even had interacted with the ‘LEGEND” !!!!.

    Vinod

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Dear Sir,

      I bet you are telling a lie! Jealousy is not one of your personality attributes. Even envy is far removed.
      Your own achievements are so impressive, that you have been a role model for many like me.

      Regards,

      Surjit

  15. Lt Gen Manmohan Singh says:

    Thank u, Surjit.
    It is just befitting tribute to our beloved legend, & the ending quote on awards is most apt. People dealing with awards must ponder over it seriously!

    Regs & best wishes.

    Manmohan

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Dear General,

      Thanks.
      You have put your finger at the right spot of the article. I think those who work for the awards are wasting time and energy. In fact awards elude those who run after them.

      With best wishes,

      Surjit

  16. Lt Gen JL Malhotra says:

    Dear surjit,
    Thank u.
    I met this great hockey wizard in 1972.We had invited him to our bn.The world wil never have a hockey player like him.May he rest in peace.Regards.

  17. Col Kulbir Singh says:

    Thank you Sir for the enlightenment.

    Kulbir

  18. Maj Gen Trilochan Singh says:

    Dear Surjit,

    Thanks for this lovely write up on the hockey legend. You may not recollect he visited NDA on coaching assignment in 1958 for ten days. We still remember some great tips that he gave us which enabled the team so very well in Gold Cup ,Bombay.
    Regards
    Sincerely,
    Trilochan

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Dear Brother,
      I have a vague memory of his visit. However, since I was in a very junior term, and was nowhere near the Academy hockey team, I suspect I did not get a chance to meet him in the NDA,
      You were, of course well known for your dexterity with the stick from the very first term!
      Regards,
      Surjit

  19. Veerendra Jaitly says:

    Dear Sir,
    It is superb and I liked your comparing the game of hockey or football with the corporate world.

    With Warm Regards,

    Veerendra K Jaitly

    09811777904

    C_cube Consultants

    101/2 Beverly Park, Plot-2

    Sector 22, Dwarka, New Delhi-110077

    Blog: http://excellenceguru.blogspot.in/

    Website:www.ccubeconsultants.com

  20. Rohini Khare says:

    Sir,
    Thanks a lot for your write up .These are the Indians who make us proud. and help me forget people like kalmadi. Thanks again.
    Rohini

    Sent via Micromax

  21. Lt Gen Vinay Shankar says:

    Surjit

    Thanks. The right kind of morning read.

    Vinay

  22. Maj Gen Aditya Jaini says:

    GR8, Sir,

    Maj Gen Jaini

    IESM

  23. Col SS Malik says:

    Sir,

    Thanks a ton sir.

    Sultan

  24. Maj Gen S C Jain says:

    Respected Sir
    There are excellent mgt lessons for all. I will share with my students.

    Thanks and regards.

    SC Jain

    • Surjit Singh says:

      SC,
      Yes. I think there is a Management lesson in this. If you convert it into a paper, do share it with us!
      Thanks.
      Surjit

  25. Col J K Bajaj says:

    Outstanding tribute to a legend of our country. A great human being
    We remember him on this day with great warmth and earnestness

    Thank you, my dear Sir, for the remarkable and befitting piece of write up

    Lucky you to have known him in person

    With our esteemed regards.
    Jk- Lalit n Girls

    • Surjit Singh says:

      JK,
      You are great!
      Sitting in Australia, looking after your grand children, visiting places, and yet keeping in touch with us!
      Thanks for the kind words!
      Surjit

  26. Lt Gen Prakash Gokarn says:

    Dear Surjit,
    You are lucky to have seen this great man, born in a different era like some of us in comparison with today.

    I am unlucky that I could not open the amolak page.

    Could you please help. You write so well and I always look forward to your mails.

    We are in Istanbul. Enjoying the hospitality of our son Ranjit. who is heading the HSBC operations in Turkey.

    Take care’

    PG

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Prakash,
      Thanks.
      As a matter of fact, I did not post anything on the blog for nearly two months. Call it a writer’s block or plain laziness.
      I have gone through your Turkey diary. It reminded me of the Great Ottoman Empire. Maybe, you will send us a story, embellished with pictures about your travelogue
      Regards,
      Surjit

  27. Rajinder Singh Bhatti says:

    Dear Veerji,

    Extraordinarily written article on the hockey legend. ….and so aptly related the values purported by him….to the way we live our lives. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

    Regards,

    Rajinder

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Raj,
      Thanks.
      Meerut conjures up memories of the most delightful days of my life.
      For one thing, I met your family there!
      Love,
      Surjit

  28. Bhanu Kumar Rai says:

    He made India proud. I went to the same school (Govt Inter College Jhansi), from where I did High School and Intermediate. He and his brother Roop Chand (who was also a member of the Indian Hockey Team for the Olympic Games) visited the school as honoured guests once during my stay there and I still remember the thrill.
    Bhanu Rai

  29. Bhanu Kumar Rai says:

    He made India proud. I went to the same school (Govt Inter College Jhansi), from where I did High School and Intermediate. He and his brother Roop Chand (who was also a member of the Indian Hockey Team for the Olympic Games) visited the school as honoured guests once during my stay there and I still remember the thrill.

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Sir,
      Thanks.
      There was something in this man which left an indelible mark on any one who saw them just once!
      Hitler was not alone in being mesmerized by his charm…
      Surjit

  30. Satish Manocha says:

    Dear friends: May like to read PERSONAL tribute to National Pride: Legendary Dhyan Chand, 3 times Olympic Medallist. :
    MAY CHECK ON LINK BELOW, AS WRITTEN BY A RETIRED GENERAL ( elder brother of Brig. Surinder Singh Retd.of IITD, my classfellow ):

    http://amolak.in/web/a-salute-to-major-dhyan-chand/

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Satish,
      You have rendered great service, by spreading this message.
      It is my fond hope that more men and women like Dhyan Chand will be born in our land to enrich our lives!
      Surjit

  31. Moreshwar Kelkar says:

    Hi Surjit,
    Reminded of “Tussi Great Ho” (you know from where?). A VI stringer; Who maintained ‘HIS’ standard, may be in all spheres…be it English, or Life!
    (2956-C (Old), XIX NDA

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Moru,
      Some are born to play and perform.
      Some come to the Earth merely as spectators.
      I belong to the latter category!
      Surjit

  32. Harman says:

    dear sir,
    welcome back. was missing your articles as u had taken couple of months break. nice article on the legend, we all grew up listening to his exploits on the field. fully agree the lessons he has shared from his experience and philosophy, are applicable even today in any sport or the corporate world.
    sometimes wonder who’ll be role models for the present generation- the sportsmen who make lot of money or someone from other fields. men of integrity are however far too few.
    please keep writing. warm regards,
    Harman

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Dear Harman,
      Yes. I took a brief hiatus. There was a tragedy in the family. Our eldest sister-in-law passed away, and that also kept me away from the desk.
      I agree with you. In India, there has been a dip in ethics. During the Independence struggle, our Nation had thrown up some totally selfless men. People did great things; without seeking reward.
      I think remembering such men is necessary, to revive the lessons they left behind for us!
      When do we see you in Chandigarh?
      Surjit

  33. raj mehta says:

    A beautifully written article on the Master Wizard.
    We salute his achievements.

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Raj,
      Thanks. Being a soldier and a sportsman yourself, I think you are with me in the salute to this remarkable Indian.
      May his tribe grow!
      Surjit

  34. This is a beautifully written piece!

    What a contrast from modern times when sportsmen weigh everything in terms of money.

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Surinder,
      Some one said, “Money is a good servant; but a bad master”
      The problem is that some of us have begun to be ruled by things which money buys for us…and that leads to moral decay!
      Surjit

  35. Manjit Singh says:

    A well-written article, as usual. Thank you.

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Brother,
      I think this piece must have revived some very pleasant memories of that period. You were on the verge of your adolescence!
      As far as I remember, Hockey was your favourite game, and Dhyan Chand’s eldest child may have been just a couple of years younger than you.
      Regards,
      Surjit

  36. Veteram Latif says:

    Salute to this Illustrious Son of India.

    “Bharath Ratna” is too late to be awarded to DhyanChand, Netaji subash chandrabose, Bhagat singh……….. Awarding them Bharath Ratna will be , be littling them.

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Latif Sahib,
      I agree with you.
      I think a more befitting tribute would be to emulate their virtues. Our awards are not a substitute for that!
      Surjit

  37. Vinod Kapoor says:

    Dear Surjit,
    We all know when you admire someone and his achievements are ignored or over looked, we feel sad. Late Maj Dhyan Chand was extra ordinary person who did proud to India (Bharat). What ever award is given to him will be immaterial. For it will be coming after 35 years of his death.
    God bless him, wherever he is. My salute to him on his 110th birthday.

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Sir,
      Thanks. The likes of Dhyan Chand are born only once in many years. They come, like Krishna and Lord Rama, to show us kindly light!
      Surjit

  38. Dave Sood says:

    Dear Surjit,

    Major Dhayan Chand did leave a profound impression on you. You have followed his advise well.

    A great advice for all players of any game. I hope it is read every time before any match starts.

    A great salute to a Soldier and his game.

    Dave Sood

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Dear Dave,
      I am beginning to come to the conclusion that every man who succeeds in life and rises to such dizzy heights acquires philosophy, and the humility which these thoughts gives him helps him in keeping his feet on the ground!
      If success leads to arrogance or ‘pride’ it leads to a fall.
      Thanks,
      Surjit

  39. colls says:

    My Dear General, Friend, Philosopher and Guide
    Let me be the first commentator this time.
    Your article brings light, into the tunnel of darkness, where most of us reside, basking in the glory of being meaningless know- alls, I can’t say knowing (FA), as all what we say here, gets recorded on the Internet .
    I happened to Google my name and was surprised at what all comments I had made. Without throwing caution to the winds, I must Sir you, which I always do, for this article and you deserve a Standing Ovation.
    Two such figures come to my mind.
    One was my SUO Harpal Singh Kaushik, Zozilla Company, 24 IMA, also a hockey player. He must have played with Dhyan Chand ji.
    Next is Milkha Singh who needs no introduction .You must have seen the movie ‘’Bhaag Milkha Bhaag.’’He was from EME.
    The next most humane person we all know, fits your next menu as indicated below is
    Amitabh Bacchhan. Do you want me to say who?
    A proverb,
    “Honours and awards distinguish the mediocre. While the superior are embarrassed by them, the decoration itself gets devalued when awarded for lesser deeds”
    The world will be a smaller place without these great three.add ons. May be some more, as my mind is limited.
    I liked hockey. I also was an outstanding school level player till I, during a game unintentionally injured my good friend Alan Gordon.
    Thereafter they made me an ‘’Outstanding’’ Player. I was made to run up and down the field, with a flag in my hand. Else, I could have given you some more homework.
    One last word
    Humility pays, but too late, as life ebbs away. Only friends like you may remember, few others may.
    Thank you
    Colls

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Sir,
      Thanks for the kind words. In my personal life, there have been very few like you. In the first two terms, I received so much support from you, that my gratitude will forever remain unpaid!
      The great men need thousands of spectators like us to become great. A Doctor needs patients and a singer can not sing without listeners. And indeed, a Commanding Officer cannot fight without the soldiers!
      Thanks for your kind words. I will stop writing the day I stop receiving encouragement from you.
      With best wishes for Veena ji.
      Surjit

      • colls says:

        My Dearest one, Surjit,
        FRIEND, PHILOSOPHER AND FOREVER GUIDE
        Don’t bring tears in my eyes; they have wept enough over the years, we have been through thick and thin aged now by ears .The only organ which continues to grow you know.
        The day you forget me, may never come in my life, as I ebb slowly into oblivion,
        the darkness the tunnel… on the other end shows no signs of light!
        Let me too pass away, as the elders for ever did say
        ‘’ soldiers never die they fade away…’
        So the day is not far away
        May the Lord bring happiness, success and
        the
        http://www.==wholewideworld
        love from across the globe display.

        I read each and every reply you gave… do not miss out any …they all have praised you today…

        Let Surjit be the Emperor of
        ‘’’Military writing …’’
        down the valley of history
        for times to stay……

        I have come a long way…. without you; never could I have said that today.

        You are family …Give my and our love and regards…to all kids and their kids and future ones too… for their welfare my family lead me too.
        Have the glory of holding the torch for ever dear
        Friend, philosopher and guide
        forget me never.
        With love and warm regards.
        Colls

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