IIT_Delhi_logo

A REUNION TO REMEMBER by Brig SURINDER SINGH

 

 PROLOGUE

 

What makes IIT Delhi the Dream-destination of Millions of our Under-graduates

What is it that makes IITs what they are? Is it the brilliant faculty, or their laboratories? Or, are the aspirants enamored by the highly subsidized fee structure? If you ask me, all these factors are relevant, but the most significant cause is the image built by the ‘IITians’. Over the years, the students who have graduated from the portals of these ‘institutes of national importance’ have performed so well, that employers reach out to them with open arms. What was it like to be in the first batch of IIT Delhi, when it was founded as ‘College of Engineering & Technology’ in 1961.   A trust was registered for the purpose and the foundation stone by laid by HRH Prince Phillip in Jan 1959. The College was affiliated to the University of Delhi.

 

The first admissions were made in Aug 1961 and the College was formally inaugrated by Prof. Humayun Kabir, Minister for Scientific Research and Cultural Affairs . In 1963, it was declared as an Institute of National Importance by an act of Parliament and renamed as Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi. The institute is an autonomous body with its own academic policies, and awards its own degrees.

 

Initially, five branches of Engg were started: Mechanical, Electrical. Civil, Chemical and Textile Technolgy,and about 125 boys were admitted. Due to some attrition, only around 103 students completed their BTech in the stipulated period of five years.

 

The first batch was unique in many ways. They had the risk taking ability to join a new college without an established brand and with no publicity except the mandatory admission notice. The buildings were yet to come up and whatever had come up was having teething problems. There were no traditions and no guidelines…Schoolboys had turned collegiate without quite knowing how to. There were no extra-curricular activities and no hobby clubs. We set them up ourselves.

 

That was both a drawback and an asset. It gave us the opportunity to do it ourselves..and we dare say we did it well. We set-up a lot many clubs, Hiking,Music, Photograhy, and various other activities.

To go down memory lane, we assembled in Delhi to celebrate the Golden Jubilee of our graduation in December 2016. Forty nine of our batch-mates came. As many as thirty came from over-seas especially for this event. Given below is a brief account of the re-union, along with some pictures.

It was fun!

  

 

 IIT Delhi

  The IIT Delhi Building, which we can never forget!

 

 

 

AN UNFORGETTABLE GET-TOGETHER

 

We saw our buddies, we met, and it was a journey down memory lane…

Ours is a well-knit group. The knots were tied when we pursued our BTech Course at IIT Delhi during the span of time from 1961 to 1966. The knots remained intact thanks to the Yahoo e-mail group in which almost all 103 boys were members. There have been several reunions of the group at various places in Delhi but Golden Jubilee Reunion of 2016 was one with a difference. It was the  Herculean effort of Harinder that made this event memorable. He left no soul unstirred, no stone unturned and here is what it finally turned out to be.

 

A warm reception at the check-in counter of the Taj Vivanta set the ball rolling. The 2 Ks, Karnani and Kataria handed over a welcome kit that contained, among other things, a souvenair entitled ” Everything you wanted to know about IITD 66 Batch” .It was the result of two research oriented PhDs, Suresh and Sood. They were the brilliant ones of our batch and settle for nothing less than perfection. The immaculate planning of the 2 Vs, Vijay and Vinod was visible in all that followed for the next three days.

 

Then began the fun:

 

 

There was Harinder Ahluwalia singing away with his melodious voice now matured like seasoned wine. The more he sang “Tumse Milna Acha Lagta Hai” the better we felt.

 

There was Harish Kalra singing ” Tasveer Banata  Hoon” like he did 50 years ago… The Tasveer is still not ready.

 

There was Bachcha Arora wanting to sing “Those were the days my friend…we thought they would never end.” His bad throat prevented him from singing.

 

There were the 20 Year young students from IIT Delhi singing Ghazals like 70 year olds with the older 70 year old veteran singing Bhangra tunes

 

There was the Bengali Prof PKSen singing ” Peke Jaan Waliyee…” in Punjabi.

 

There was Rami Sandhu dancing like a girl one third her age.

 

There was Lalit as loud as ever

 

There was Suraj Puri struggling with his You-tube presentation that was slow to open.It was difficult to decide whether the Doctor was more learned or Suraj.

 

There was Jyothi ( Shortys wife) having a dig at both his height and at Chinese Language.

 

There was Shivalik Hostel with prominently displayed letters ESTD 1961.

 

And finally the summing up by  Ms Pala Chowdhry…who said that it was all nothing but a four letter word LOVE that held the group together.

 

The man who was missed most was IS Gill. More than 100 times, I was asked : ” Why has IS not come?” All I could answer was: “Come to Chandigarh and we will fix up a get-together with him”. That is the best that I can do.

 

The offer is a standing invitation from me to all my batch-mates.

Now, let us see some pictures. They tell the story better than words!

 

Brig Surinder Singh

2135, Phase 7, Mohali

Phone 919592092712 e-mail : surinder2135 [at] gmail.com

 

 reunion pictures

This is the group of ‘boys’ who attended the Golden Jubilee Re-union in Dec 2016 (Average age 72 yrs). They plan for the next re-union in 2019 when we turn 75.

IIT Delhi group pic

There was only one hostel, when we joined; Shivalik Hostel estd 1961. Here, you see Karnani, Surinder, “Shorty” Venkatramanan and Arora. Surinder is almost a six-footer, so you can estimate the height of Venkat, who retired as CMD of L&T

 social gathering IITD

This is an informal social gathering, to give you a view of the ‘better halves’

 

 

 harwinder ahluwalia

Harinder Ahluwalia, receiving a silver salver from the Director, IIT D, Prof VR Rao

 

surinder with friends 

Four friends: Jhingran, Karnani, Surinder and HV Chadha

 

 haryanvi dance

Now, a few scenes from the party: A Haryanvi dance by Harsh Vardhan Chadha

 

 

jain 

Next, PK Sen singing ‘Peke jaan valie’ with Harinder Ahluwalia looking on.

 

punjabi dance 

Punjabi dance by Rami Sandhu and partner. Looking on is Shorty ( K Venkataramanan)

 

clapping 

Clapping…The performances received a standing ovation

manocha

Satish Manocha, who hails from our village, Faruka (Dist Sargodha, now in Pakistan) at the Taj, in Delhi. He is a family friend. Satish rose to an apex level in ITI, Ltd

                                                    

 surider and satinder

And finally, a picture of the author, Brig Surinder Singh, with his wife, Satinder

 

But the story does not end here. The editor and his friend  has something to say, after you have seen another facet of the architecture of IIT Delhi

 

 IITD architecture

 

*

 

EPILOGUE (From the Editor’s Desk)

An Unfair Comparison

We are four brothers. The eldest, Air Vice Marshal Manjit Singh was in the third batch of IIT Kharagpur (1953-57) The second (the Late) Mr Manmohan Singh (Chief Engr, Pb Irrigation) followed him in IIT Kgp. And my younger brother, Brig Surinder is the author of the above piece. I joined the NDA in Jan 1958, have a compulsive urge to compare my life with my siblings. I must add here, that the army was kind enough to depute me to IIT Delhi for an M Tech in 1975-77. And so I got an opportunity to compare the two career options.

I was commissioned in 1961, and we celebrated our ‘Golden Jubilee’ in the IMA in 2011. After speaking to Surinder, and reading the above story, I find the following differences. (Though, at the very outset, it must be admitted that comparing the two streams is like comparing chalk with cheese!)

  • The IITians met as equals, and made no attempt to compare their performance with each other. We, on the other hand carried our ranks. And those who had risen to higher ranks expected a ‘preferential’ treatment.

  • Nearly every IITian wants his grandchild to vie for a seat in an IIT. I cannot say that about my military comrades.

  • The erudite amongst us spend a lot of time and effort to say that the military has been given a raw deal by the government. I have not seen a single article written by an IITian to express discontent.

  • All IITians do not rise to similar positions in the industry. Some climb to apex levels, like CMDs and Presidents of corporations, others fall on the way. But they do not complain. Makes me wonder whether our selection process is fair.

  • IITs neither assure a job or even a career. The military provides job security as well as a pension. Yet, it is more than obvious, that IITs are the preferred option in the society.

  • Many IITians feel so indebted to their alma-mater that they come back and donate millions to the Institute. This very batch has pledged a sum of Rs Fifty Lakhs to IIT Delhi. In sharp contrast, military officers feel that they have neither been paid well nor given the due respect.

  • I am given to understand that of the 103 students who graduated in 1966, about 13 have passed away. Our course-mates were about the same age as the IITians. However, when we met for our Golden Jubilee, in 2011, nearly one-third had died. Whilst some had fallen in the wars, many more had succumbed to natural causes. A study carried out on this subject by experts reveals that the life expectancy of soldiers is significantly less than that of civilians. The causes need to be examined. 

In sum, it appears to me that the alumni of the IITs have done a better job of projecting the image of their Institute than us!

*

Wing Commander J Thomas’ Views on the Subject

(My NDA course-mate, Wg Cdr Joseph Thomas,VM,  is an alumnus of the USAF Aerospace Research Pilots School, now called the USAF Test Pilots School.  On his return to India, he started the IAF Test Pilots School which trains the nation’s flight test engineers and test pilots.  When started in 1973, it was only the 5th such institution in the world and the first in a developing country.  Even today there are globally only 7 flight test training institutions.)

Comments on Epilogue

Yes, it is unfair to compare IITs with NDA.  NDA is in a different league altogether.  The training includes a lot more professional and field activities.  Military training takes up the major time.  NDA produces officers and gentlemen.  IITs produce mathematicians who move on to finance and general management.  The actual engineering in India is led by the Regional Engineering Colleges (RECs), now called National Institutes of Technology.  

We need to distinguish between NDA as an institution and the career path open to its graduates.  NDA graduates face a dead end career, thanks to closing of exit options.  Worldwide, the norm is a five year bond for graduates of military officer training academies.  India imposes a lifelong bond.

The Indian military officer is in a cage of his own making.  They have not been “given a raw deal by the government.”   It has been a raw deal imposed on themselves.

Yes, the military “provides job security as well as a pension.”   And the military clamours for more job security and more pension.  Proof enough that the Indian military has developed a  babu mentality.

Given below is a recent picture of be-medalled Thomas, at a veterans’ function, to remind you of him.

 joseph thomas

Wing Commander Joseph Thomas, VM (XIX NDA, E/H Sqn)

 

 

 

 

  1. IS Gill says:

    Hi,

    Thanks a lot .enjoyed reading the journal.will take out a printout.missed out on such an interesting event,entirely my loss-regards

    Inderjit

  2. Col M B Jauhari says:

    I attended 40 year reunion of IIT Roorkee 1975 batch in Dec 2015 at IIT Roorkee. When i studied there it was known as University of Roorkee.

    It is not the IMA or NDA which does the damage, it is subsequent service in the forces where ACR promotions etc become most important for some people and in the process they start seeing their course mates as the rivals even adversaries. Thus bonhomie becomes the casualty. Defense officers are always comparing who is doing better than whom and who attained what rank- which is so unhealthy. Forces give us best quality of life but we mess up the happiness by constant comparison and urge to attain higher rank.

    One thing beats me.. why there are so many early deaths in military due to non combat reasons. We had 22 officers in 43 Tech EME Batch- five of us are no more.. Baljit Road accident 1986. Panda Road Accident 2002, Degwekar Cancer 2012,OP Misra Heart Attack 2014, Arun Kumar Diabetes 2013.

    where as IIT Roorkee batch had only six deaths in 180 strength out of which Arun Kumar is common to both lists.

    And what is to be noted is that this is a much younger set with current age 61 to 65 years.

    Just thought of sharing.

    Thanks for posting another article requiring introspection and thinking.

    Regards

    Jauhari Col MB

  3. Surindar Singh says:

    Surjit,

    Comments from my batch-mate Sandhu. He was our hockey captain and arbitrator on all physical disputes owing to his built.

    Many times he has reminded me of Brig Parmar, of EME but I am unable to place him.Maybe you know him.

    Surinder

  4. Parmjit Sandhu says:

    Dear Brig.Surinder,

    A “REVIEW TO REMEMBER” is very well compiled by you…..dear surinder.

    Thanks for the pleasant comments on Rami Sandhu …..and her photo dancing

    with Pawan jain(Chemical) appearing in the write up is interesting.

    Am sending your write up to Brig.Parmar , Military College of Engineering (EME), 1968 batch Pass out, son of

    Late Air Chief Marshal Dilbagh Singh , incidentally you were his instructor (Secundrabad)) and was my colleague in Grand Venice Project,G.Noida.

    Also sending Copy to my Son-in law Col.manmohan , Son gurmeet in Toronto, and Ex-Registrar(1992-2004) IITD Col.Avtar Singh malhotra and to IITian 1967 batch who attended our 50 yrs celebration i.e Om Pundit and BL Golcha etc , found it to be interesting and worth circulation.

    Parmjit sandhu

  5. Lalit Mehra says:

    Hi Linder,

    EXCELLENT SUMMATION – and I am saying it as loudly as I can!

    God bless

    Lalit

    • Surinder singh says:

      It was estimated that there were only 10 percent boys with no nick-names. Many of them were more amusing than mine. That glossary should be separately prepared and kept confidential.
      Thanks ….err…Lalit

  6. Harinder Ahluwalia says:

    Hi Surinder,

    I have already prepared the attached document which I have not yet circulated it because I am still reviewing it.

    Yours is an interesting summary and will also be distributed.

    Thanks a lot,

    Harinder

    • Surindar Singh says:

      Dear Harinder,

      Fabulous indeed!

      Yet another Herculean effort from Harinder.

      Comprehensive in coverage,Systematic in style,Delightful in description.

      This is the reaction at first glance. Shall read it word for word soon.

      Profound regards,

      Surinder

  7. Arun Sood says:

    Hi Surinder,

    Thanks much – yes very interesting read and the pics are great for context. Thanks for the kind words – my role was limited, but was a great opportunity to read of class mate experiences. For the last 15 years I visit India once an year – method of recharging and renergizing myself. Unfortunately, family constraints made me skip these visits a couple of times.

    You and your family has a strong commitment to national service and discovery / knowledge. Congratulations. I loved your story of how you discovered that you were doing unnecessary work. In my years of consulting, I have discovered that for many reasons the boss often does not have clue to the real problem – they have personal bias – the real trick is to present the results in a fashion that the boss can accept it. One of my failures in this regards – at EIL I lead a team to study the project management at Atomic Energy Commission – Sethna was the Director. I presented 3 solutions – I thought solution 1 was best – Sethna chose the current status – one of the AEC engineers/dept heads pointed out the anomaly – but Sethna would not budge – my presentation was not deep enough or clear enough. I have been much more careful since then. EIL was a very good learning experience.

    Keep in touch and hopefully we can connect. BTW, do check out my website below – if I am able to introduce this approach in the Indian environment that would be great boost to my self respect.

    Cheers,
    > Arun

    • Surindar Singh says:

      Dear Arun,
      Just browsed through your website. It is a tremendous initiative and that too in an area which is on white hot priority with Trump.
      Great going!
      Would love to stay in touch with you
      Surinder

  8. S P Kataria says:

    Dear Surinder Singh

    I did read your earlier one page note of summarizing the activities (sent to the whole group) but really could not understand the purpose and felt that it was like jotting down notes of what happened during those 2-3 days for your own memory. I did not realize that you would be expecting any responses from batch mates to the same.

    Your new document does sound very interesting and presentable although I have gone through it casually and in a hurry to get a feel of it. It certainly needs to be read in peace and leisure.

    My this immediate response to your mail is to check with you whether you are expecting any comments and if so from what perspective. In general I would say, it is really a nice presentation.

    While on the subject I may let you know that Harinder Ahluwalia is preparing a formal record of the proceedings and has so far made a draft document of approx. 60+ pages. He is including all photos and narrating the sequence of happenings during the GJC, even describing what songs and poems were sung by whom etc.

    Satti

  9. Suresh Borkar says:

    Hi Surinder Ji:

    Thanks for sharing your write-up and your brother’s comments. Very nice and interesting, especially the comparisons between IITans and Army personnel.

    You may know that Harinder is putting together a GJC document. It may be a good idea for you to send your write-up and the reference to him for inclusion in it.

    Take care

    Suresh B.

  10. Virendra Mittal says:

    Thanks for the interesting article on Reunion of the IIT 1966 batch.
    On 7 December 2016 we had a Batchmate Golden Jubilee get-together in IIT Delhi Campus. Many came from
    USA, UK, Dubai etc and the rest of us from outstation and Delhi. It was good fun.
    The above article will be forwarded to my batchmates as we know some of the 1966 guys in the the
    photograph. Brig S S has written well and is worth reading again.
    Virendra

  11. Vijay Malik says:

    Dear Surinder,

    I take the liberty of not addressing you by your rank for obvious reasons. I am gladdened by the piece written by you and critically analysed by your brother, General Surjit Singh. I for one never thought of the parallel lives of us after schooling, us in IITs and some in NDA. It gives an insight as to how the life progresses when we select our education. Or do we really select? In my case, it was selected by my parents and as a sixteen year old I left Hindu College to join CET (IITD). I am happy that my parents made the right choice.

    It was a memorable Reunion and will always stay with me for the rest of life.Special thanks to spouses who had no association like us but gelled even better than us and this contributed immensely to the success of the event.

    Thank you to all who made it but we missed the one who could but did not.

    Three Cheers

    Vijay Malik

  12. S J Singh says:

    Sir,
    The spirit of the re-union is more evident in the pictures than what is conveyed through the report.
    We are fortunate in this generation that pictures are so easy to take and then they can be shared with thousands of people at no cost whatsoever!
    As they say, a picture tells a thousand words!
    SJ

  13. Joseph Thomas says:

    I just want to make a small clarification. My pic was taken at my old school in May 2015. Being a semi-military school, the annual day includes a ceremonial parade. That’s why I was wearing medals.

    Joseph Thomas

  14. N P Singh says:

    Dear General,

    Thanks for sending the link. It is heartwarming and nostalgic.

    We are glad to know about you. Wish you a very very Happy New Year and to Brigadier also.

    with regards,

    n.p.singh

  15. Ramani K says:

    Dear Gen Surjit,

    A very interesting article and it was gripping. Both NDA and IIT start after school. After NDA you know what you will get and then continue . Not so with IIT, After getting Mech or Electrical Computer Science you join IIM and then you have nothing to do with what you did there for four years. A majority do other than what they trained for. Good or bad is not the point, you have the option to quit and then you have a flying start …. due to the name of institution. One can carry on.

    Satisaction either way is personal.

    best regards

    ramani k

  16. Parminder Singh says:

    SS,

    Thanks for sharing this delightful blog.At he risk of offending you(which I have no intention) I entirely agree with the views of Wing Commander Thomas on the comparsion of the two different instituations.I might also mention that when I attended reunions of my course both at NDAand IMA respectively I did not observe anyone pulling his rank.Infact the genteman in adjoining cabin was the ex CNS.More when we meet…….

    PS

  17. Yogish Chander Mehra says:

    Dear Gen,

    Ur mails are a treat always as u enjoy the knack of presenting history laced with clear msgs. Brig Surinder was my instr in Deg Course but i had never the opportunity to serve together either with him or you as u both were mostly within EME & i outside of it.

    Bringing comparisons with Institutions & Def Trg academies was novel. Those who spent time outside while studying or even thereafter & then joining Forces is an altogether experience as these are the guys who always hv a second career waiting after retirement & that too in professional fields unlike most others joining Maruti outfits or Security agencies.

    Wish Brig Surinder’s id was also shared.

    With Regards,

    Yogi

  18. Anupinder Kaur says:

    Great memories captured. Nice pic of satinder chahcha chachi ji.

    We had some good times with Commander Thomas visiting us here in Connecticut.
    Anu

  19. Baldev Sood says:

    General Sa’ab,

    Always a pleasure to read your articles.

    On the subject of differences in I I T vs. N D A and I M A:

    Unlike I I Ts or any other such Institutions, NDA/IMA is totally free.

    Entrance into NDA/IMA guarantees a well defined life long career.

    This is not to ignore or undermine the nationalistic and patriotic sentiments in military careers.

    Joining the defence services is purely voluntary as there is no conscription in force in India.

    Any direct comparison is not possible and not even relevant.

    In any democratic nation both civil and military services have to play vital and complimentary roles and there should be mutual respect between them.

    Best wishes for the New Year!

    Baldev Sood

  20. yoginder sharma says:

    My compliments to Brig Surinder for capturing so well the mood of the memorable Reunion and salute to the spirit of the IITDians. But the icing on the cake was the stimulating Epilogue. Views of both (all three) brilliant contributors are valid and valuable.
    Here is my take, for whatever it is worth- focussed as you technical geniuses always are just as diffused and scattered-brained shall I be!
    Surjit, your perceptions are objective and mostly about external/observable dimensions. You have compared ‘hawks vs peacocks’ – both are beautiful but incomparable. The essence of military leadership is ‘spiritual’ seeking the ultimate in selfless service-not merely excellence in domains of intellect, productivity, processes- presumably, as in the world of technology or management. Both sides have unique ethos, end-results, work/sub cultures (hierarchy, Regtl or Corps affiliations), training/career profiles and compensation . The service experience is not homogenous hence enculturates differently, sometimes breeds toxic tendencies and high people-power corrupts egoes. The comradeship quotient fluctuaues and so do values. My short point is that the dynamics is complex and beyond rational analysis of cerebral minds. Remember ‘hawks’ soar high are very focussed not so the pretty ‘peacocks’- nature made it so! Celebrate both and the Grand-weaver’s design AS IT IS!
    Incidentally, Gen Guru Bakshi of 8 NDA/F was with me yesterday. He recounted their spirit through all these years, including Golden and Diamond celebrations at Pune and DD, took my breath away- check out from anyone for details. I wish I could say that for my own batch/self but each of us are unique- incomparable!

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Affable General,

      I agree with every word of your message.

      Personally, I had a very satisfying time in the army. No regret. I was allowed to do what I wanted to…and after the service, I got an opportunity to be with the Industry as well as the academia. What more could I have asked for?
      Can you send me Gen Bakshi’s e-mail ID? I met him when he was in the AG’s Branch, in 1988-89.
      Happy New Year.
      Surjit

  21. Dave Sood says:

    I can feel the happiness and the electric charge in their reunion.

    We stayed in Cadets Barracks and were proud to be hosed there. They were at Taj Vivanta. Makes a difference in happiness.

    Our standards and measurable goals are different to any civilian graduate School.

    I think we all were happy and had a good weekend at IMA.

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Dave,
      You have said a lot in the very first sentence!
      Our get together has a different flavour. We live in a different world. It has its own charm!
      Thanks.
      Surjit

  22. DALJIT MADAN says:

    Hi 2997- Enjoyed reading through the article. And the comparison you have drawn between Army and IIT. It is not an Apple to Apple comparison. Both have their pluses and minuses.Notwithstanding this , the peculiarities brought out by you are apt.
    I just could not recoginise Thomas .Rgds 3000.

  23. BRIG.AKSHEY KAPILA says:

    My Dear Reader, I had the unique experience of selecting IIT Delhi Grads for A FIRM IN CANADA IN 2000. This involved making a presentation to the aspirants in the huge auditorium of the IIT. Conducting a written test [ The questions had been set by the firm]. Asessing the papers by the IIT professors & firm faculty. Conducting HRD tests by my panel & finally a Video conference by the faculty in Canada. My panel consisted of three service veterans & psychologists formed by me. The impression left on us by the IIT aspirants was [a] An immense respect for the service officers as none of us was a engineer & yet selecting them. [b] A very strong competetion amongst the aspirants to make the grade. [ c] Avery high IQ level [d] All excet 5% of them asked how could they join the services if they did not make it. You may draw your own conclusions after reading this piece. A.KAPILA

  24. Brigadier(Retd) K Harikumar says:

    Very happy to read through Surinder’s report on the reunion. I went through a similar experience in 2014 when 104 of a batch of 120 students from our engg college met after 50 years,70 of them with their spouse at the college.
    Such events teach us a lot on Life in general and facilitate a journey down memory lane.

    Thank you Gen Surjit and Brig Surinder for sharing this.
    Rgds
    Brig Harikumar

  25. Karumbaya Codanda says:

    You all are talking of ‘job security’. What about ‘life security’? There is no comparison between the Armed Forces and Civilians.

  26. Satish Manochs says:

    Thanks Respected Gen Surjit ji, Brig Surinder, & their friend Thomas; for a wifeful summary and follow up by a nice comparison of learnings , trainings in different set ups ; then growth later for a long set of careers…
    As well said no simple way to see the growth paths .
    The IIT D we were in as first batch, is unique with enormous help in our days from the management, the British Aid, the expectations of the Govt of India.. to create Scientist Engineers.. as one main objective told by Sh Human hun Kabir in his Inaugural speech in 1961.
    We are probably near that objective as the learnings continued for most of us… in their own interest with nice ground work laid in those 5 years by the Faculty, with some faculty with British industry experience. Example of Sh. K. P. P. Nambar who headed British Philips industry and taught us basic circuit designs. Later he created Kerala Electronics Corp. plus many new ventures in India. The Scientists who taught us included Prof. Saudha , well known researcher of the world, like this many more for our young brains. No one can forget the best expert in Microwave, Prof. John Brown. who went back to Imperial College London with lots of contribution to Indian faculty and IETE as well.
    I don’t want this to be a forum to recall, but that kind of education helped steer our independent careers on our decision. Not many guides at that time on graduation…
    Small edit for Surinder ;} : my picture is taken in the same hotel Taj Vivanta Surajkund ( not Delhi) near the Swim pool; hotel where we all 49 batchmates stayed from 15th to 17th Dec

    • Surjit Singh says:

      Satish,
      Thanks a lot for the clarifications and the sentiments expressed.
      Meeting you, as I said, was the best thing to happen to both of us. I hope we meet again…and soon
      Surjit

  27. Satish Manochs says:

    Thanks Respected Gen Surjit ji, Brig Surinder, & their friend Thomas; for a wifeful summary and follow up by a nice comparison of learnings , trainings in different set ups ; then growth later for a long set of careers…
    As well said no simple way to see the growth paths .
    The IIT D we were in as first batch, is unique with enormous help in our days from the management, the British Aid, the expectations of the Govt of India.. to create Scientist Engineers.. as one main objective told by Sh Human hun Kabir in his Inaugural speech in 1961.
    We are probably near that objective as the learnings continued for most of us… in their own interest with nice ground work laid in those 5 years by the Faculty, with some faculty with British industry experience. Example of Sh. K. P. P. Nambar who headed British Philips industry and taught us basic circuit designs. Later he created Kerala Electronics Corp. plus many new ventures in India. The Scientists who taught us included Prof. Saudha , well known researcher of the world, like this many more for our young brains. No one can forget the best expert in Microwave, Prof. John Brown. who went back to Imperial College London with lots of contribution to Indian faculty and IETE as well.
    I don’t want this to be a forum to recall, but that kind of education helped steer our independent careers on our decision. Not many guides at that time on graduation…
    Small edit for Surinder ;} : my picture is taken in the same hotel Taj Vivanta Surajkund ( not Delhi) near the Swim pool; hotel where we all 49 batchmates stayed from 15th to 17th Dec

    • Satish Manochs says:

      Thanks Respected Gen Surjit ji, Brig Surinder, & their friend Thomas; for a wifeful summary and follow up by a nice comparison of learnings , trainings in different set ups ; then growth later for a long set of careers…
      As well said no simple way to see the growth paths .
      The IIT D we were in as first batch, is unique with enormous help in our days from the management, the British Aid, the expectations of the Govt of India.. to create Scientist Engineers.. as one main objective told by Sh Human hun Kabir in his Inaugural speech in 1961.
      We are probably near that objective as the learnings continued for most of us… in their own interest with nice ground work laid in those 5 years by the Faculty, with some faculty with British industry experience. Example of Sh. K. P. P. Nambar who headed British Philips industry and taught us basic circuit designs. Later he created Kerala Electronics Corp. plus many new ventures in India. The Scientists who taught us included Prof. Saudha , well known researcher of the world, like this many more for our young brains. No one can forget the best expert in Microwave, Prof. John Brown. who went back to Imperial College London with lots of contribution to Indian faculty and IETE as well.
      I don’t want this to be a forum to recall, but that kind of education helped steer our independent careers on our decision. Not many guides at that time on graduation…
      Small edit for Surinder ;} : my picture is taken in the same hotel Taj Vivanta Surajkund ( not Delhi) near the Swim pool; hotel where we all 49 batchmates stayed from 15th to 17th Dec
      Typo.. I meant wonderful summary…

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